Sunday, November 13

HOW TO WRITE A LEARNING STORY


A Learning Story is a format used to document a child’s learning.  It uses “story telling” to describe a child’s learning process. Basically it’s a narrative of recognizing and describing the learning that takes place through a child’s play.

Learning stories help evaluate and plan for future play that extends upon a child’s interest and strengths.

THE LEARNING STORY FORMAT

There are FOUR MAIN COMPONENTS to a learning story.
1.       The Learning Story itself
2.       Analysis of Learning,
3.       Extension Ideas
4.       Linking to the Learning Outcomes: ELECT (Early Learning Every Child Today) or HDLH? (How Does Learning Happen?)
*Photos and parent input can be added but are optional.

HOW TO WRITE A LEARNING STORY
FIRST, have photos of the child during the experience.  They help to create the story, and the more details you can convey the better.  

SECOND, write the text that goes with the photos.  Use descriptive details of the learning that took place. Remember not to just write a photo caption.  Write a story.
Outline when and where the experience took place –where the story starts.
Describe the events that led up to this experience.  It's fine to use first person using “I”.

For example: Over the past few days Kelly has been identifying different colours within the environment. I wanted to extend on this experience by introducing a colour mixing experiment. While outside today I set up the paint pots of yellow, blue and red and tarps.

ANALYSIS OF LEARNING
Identify and include the learning that took place within this experience.  Aim to describe why the events are significant to the child, and describe why this experience was important for the child involved.




Some Sentence Starters:
·         Through this experience
·         As a result
·         It appears that
·         With regard to
·         It can be seen that
·         According to
·         As identified

Once you have a sentence starter as well as the learning outcome you just put it together. Remember to put yourself in the first person by using “I”.

For example: Through this experience I observed Kelly as a confident and involved learner.

EXTENSION OF LEARNING
Think about how you may want to encourage, extend the interests, abilities, understandings and play that have been demonstrated throughout the learning story. This can include another type of experience, a particular game or a topic that the child may want to explore.

For example: To extend on this learning experience we will set up a marble painting experience which will enable Kelly to continue experimenting with mixing colours together.


LINK TO ELECT or HDLH?
Use the learning outcomes you have focused the learning experience on, and outline how the play targets or results in the planned learning.
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Adapted from: How to Write a Learning Story.  Lorina.  Aussienetwork.com