Monday, September 30

CREATIVE IDEA JOURNALS


WRITE OUT LOUD!

The child's writing journey begins with the ability to print and never ends.


WHY CHILDREN NEED TO WRITE

  • Writing is practical, school related, and social.  It helps children express ideas through a universal medium.  Children need to be comfortable writing.  Writing, like reading, throws open the doors to the learning world.

  • Writing well requires practice, and practice can come in many forms.  Think beyond assignments and essays.  Children can practice writing very early: to do lists, car trip notes, photo captions, toy inventories are all small ways that children can practice the written word.  Children also need sufficient time to write.  They need to gather ideas, arrange them in their mind, before they can write anything down in a meaningful format.

  • Writing like reading needs a comfortable environment where children are encouraged to take risks. Insist on a supportive group environment.

CREATIVE IDEA JOURNALS


WHAT ARE THEY?

Creative idea journals can either be picture and writing journals where children freely express focused ideas.

HOW TO DO THEM:

  • Provide children with an idea:  an interesting picture, a short news article, a funny story, a series of jokes, a short movie clip, or a collection of objects.
 
  • Give children 5-10 minutes to write about whatever comes into their mind, based upon the idea provided.

  • Encourage children to write about anything related to the idea.  They can describe what was given to them, or how the idea made them feel.  They can jot down a memory, a plan, or another interesting idea in relation to what's provided.


  • As each child finishes, encourage them to draw a picture in relation to what they have written.


HOW TO KEEP WRITING GOING

  • Suggest children take notes or write lists—car trip notes, sports event notes, field trip notes.
  • Encourage journal writing—before bed is a great time to take out an under pillow journal and write a few thoughts before bed, even if it's just things to remember for the next day.
  • Write together—let children see you write.  Role modeling goes a long way.
  • Make lists – toys, games, books, cards, to do, groceries, places to go, fun ideas and post them on the fridge for children to read or see.
  • Have children copy if necessary.   Favorite stories or poems, interesting quotes, or the backs of collector cards.  Nothing has to be fancy.  You just want them to write.